Monthly Archives: November 2014

Disable background updates on Fedora 21 / GNOME 3.14

If you use frequently a mobile internet connection with a monthly traffic limit, like me, you probably want control over automatic updates to avoid wasting traffic data.

GNOME 3.14 has a feature to automatically check for new updates using its gSoftware application. This feature can be disabled using the gsettings command line tool:

$ gsettings set org.gnome.software download-updates false

If you are not familiar with the terminal, also the graphical dconf-editor can be used.

First you need to install it:

$ sudo yum install dconf-editor

then, as normal user run it:

$ dconf-editor

now navigate to org.gnome.settings-daemon.software schema and un-tick the download-updates flag:

dconf-editor-updates

If you are using an older version of GNOME the schema is slight different. For Fedora 20/GNOME 3.10 you can take a look at this post http://worldofgnome.org/fedora-20-gnome-software-tips-and-tricks/.

OpenShift Cookbook by Packt Publishing

Author: Shekhar Gulati
Publisher: Packt Pubblications
URL: https://www.packtpub.com/virtualization-and-cloud/openshift-cookbook
GitHub: https://github.com/OpenShift-Cookbook

On Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/OpenShift-Cookbook-Shekhar-Gulati/dp/1783981202/

This great book lets you, with a very little effort, to understand the OpenShift technology. You don’t need a strong background on virtualization and container technologies, but at the same time it does not get bored a skilled user.

The overview on the OpenShift technology and its utilities (rhc) is very clear and easy to follow, also thanks to the OpenShift free profile which allows you to test and play with the rhc command while you go through with the book reading. More complex tasks like backups, snapshots, rollbacks are addressed and explained. Also the security aspects are taken into account.

Several real-world examples, with end-to-end receipts, are showed in the book: MySQL, PostgreSQL, MongoDB for database apps, Python, Java, Node.js for web oriented development.

A chapter is dedicated on how to use Jenkins CI as a Continuous Integration system for OpenShift apps; this is an aspect which is most of the times not took into account, but it’s very important nowadays.

I would consider as the “core” of the book the chapter on scaling OpenShift applications, which is a salient characteristic of OpenShift and it is not always an easy task to solve.

In conclusion a must have book if you want to start and play with OpenShift, even if you are a beginner or if you are not but you don’t have familiarity with complex and scalable application deployment.

All the code mentioned in the book is available on their GitHub repo: https://github.com/OpenShift-Cookbook.

Create a new Fedora LXC container using yum

In this tutorial we are going to install an LXC container with Fedora 21 to be run on a Fedora 21 host with libvirt. This can be used to create containers to be managed by my WebVirtMgr web panel.

Install the new filesystem

yum -y --installroot=/var/lib/libvirt/filesystems/fedora21 --releasever=21 --nogpg install systemd passwd yum fedora-release vim openssh-server procps-ng iproute net-tools dhclient less

Create the libvirt domain

virt-install --connect lxc:/// --name fedora21 --ram 512 --filesystem /var/lib/libvirt/filesystems/fedora21/,/

This command will also start the domain. Now it’s time to stop it and do some post install configurations.

Post-installation setup

Press Ctrl + ] to detach from the domain console. Than stop it:

virsh -c lxc:/// shutdown fedora21

Change root password

chroot /var/lib/libvirt/filesystems/fedora21 /bin/passwd root

Setup the hostname

echo "mynewlxc" > /var/lib/libvirt/filesystems/fedora21/etc/hostname

Setup the network

cat << EOF > /var/lib/libvirt/filesystems/fedora21/etc/sysconfig/network
NETWORKING=yes
EOF
cat << EOF > /var/lib/libvirt/filesystems/fedora21/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
ONBOOT=yes
DEVICE=eth0
EOF

Setup SSH

chroot /var/lib/libvirt/filesystems/fedora21/
ln -s /usr/lib/systemd/system/sshd.service /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/
exit

Start the container

virsh -c lxc:/// start fedora21

Or, if you are using my WebVirtMgr web panel fork you can start / stop the domain using it.

The Fedora 21 LX

The Fedora 21 LXC

Source

Thanks to major.io for his original article. It contains also some important considerations about security.

WebVirtMgr with LXC support

This is the connections page backported from WebVirtMgr 4.8.7

https://github.com/daniviga/webvirtmgr/

WebVirtMgr (by retspen) is a simple but great libvirt frontend written in python with Django. It currently supports only KVM as hypervisor. However libvirt can be already used to manage other hypervisors (like XEN) and it also supports LXC containers.

Using the container libvirt feature I extended WebVirtMgr, creating a fork, which adds LXC support and other minor improvements (see https://github.com/daniviga/webvirtmgr/commits/master)

LXC support currently has some limitations:

  • The LXC container filesystem must be created manually (this is a libvirt limitation)
  • Even the LXC domain creation isn’t supported right now (you need to create the XML and define the domain manually, virt-install can be used)
  • Web remote console is under development and not yet ready (some work has been made using butterfly)
  • LXC domain deletion doesn’t remove its filesystem
  • Snapshotting is not supported (another libvirt limitation, it can be done manually with LVM or Btrfs)

But basic functions works well:

  • Management of remote hosts (via TCP, SSH, TLS, socket)
  • Start, stop, shutdown, pause
  • Autostart
  • CPU and RAM limits assignment
  • Network interfaces management
  • Clone (only the domain, filesystem must be copied manually)

My WebVirtMgr fork contains also some minor differences and improvements compared to the original:

  • The old connections list page (with a table instead of boxes) has been kept
  • It supports a very basic ACLs system (for both KVM and LXC). With this feature non-admin users can be created (using the django-admin interface) that can only have specific access to a pre-defined set of VMs/LXCs. This means that user “foo“, for example, can only start/stop/shutdown or access the remote console of the VM “my_vm

The installation procedure remains the same as the original project.

Screenshots

This is the connections page backported from WebVirtMgr 4.8.7

This is the connections page backported from WebVirtMgr 4.8.7

KVM instances

The KVM instances view

The LXC instances view

The LXC instances view

An example of a running LXC container

An example of a running LXC container

An LXC domain can be cloned, and a random MAC address can be generated

An LXC domain can be cloned, and a random MAC address can be generated

An example of an LXC deletion

An example of an LXC deletion

Instance admin interface: you can assign users

Instance admin interface: you can assign users

 Links